A Philippine Human Rights NGO providing Psychosocial Services and Rehabilitation to Internally Displaced Persons and Survivors of Torture and Organized Violence.

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Latest News

Balay has likened to an act of a “thief in the night” the secretive manner of the burial of the late deposed  dictator Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LnmB-“Hero’s Cemetery”) on November 13.  

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The Balay Rehabilitation Center, convener of the United Against Torture Coalition in the Philippines (UATC) and civil society prime mover of the accession of the Philippines to the Optional Protocol To The Convention Against Torture (OPCAT), has organized a forum to mark the tenth anniversary of the entry into force of the OPCAT in Hotel Rembrandt on November 11, 2016.

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Balay was able to document 44 allegations of torture within the third quarter of the year, covering the period July-September 2016. The victims are all residents in conflict-affected areas in Mindanao, notably in the island of Basilan where government forces are engaged in a deadly operations against the ‘lawless activities’ of the Abu Sayyaf Group, and in the Davao region and in North Cotabato where the New People’s Army has been posing an armed challenged against the Philippines security forces.

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R. A. 9851: A Breakthrough Law for International Humanitarian Law Enforcement in the Philippines

RA-9851Republic Act Number 9851, the new "Philippine Act on Crimes Against International Humanitarian Law, Genocide and Other Crimes Against Humanity" signed into law on 11 December 2009, is a breakthrough law for the enforcement of International Humanitarian Law (IHL) as well as human rights in the Philippines. For the first time here, a national statute defines and penalizes "the most serious crimes of concern to the international community as a whole" -- namely, war crimes, genocide, and other crimes against humanity. This could be even more significant than R. A. No. 9745, the "Anti-Torture Act of 2009" signed into law about a month earlier on 10 November 2009. To the credit of the 14th Congress and of the Arroyo administration, they have delivered this significant one-two punch for human rights and IHL and possibly a few more good Pacquiao-like punch combinations, during the "last round" of this Congress and administration before bowing out in mid-2010. But credit is also due to the various human rights and IHL advocates in civil society and in government who have worked long and hard for these and related legislations as well as administrative measures.

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